The JPI Group can partner with you for your client's small business or diversity spend initiatives. Our team has over 20 years of experience working with Aerotek and the AGS family in various capacities. Our understanding of Aerotek culture, goals, and messaging will allow us to deliver a seamless solution to current and target clients.

Our Goal is to:

  • Educate and help you understand how to leverage Small Business and Supplier Diversity programs to add more value to your customers to grow your spread
  • Help you gain access to exclusive REQs and RFP opportunities
  • Allow you to fill requirements which are out of scope by providing necessary insurance

How To Identify Opportunities With Current and Target Clients?

Buzzwords: Hear these, Call JPI

 

  • Small Business Spend
    • SBA (Small Business Administration)
  • Supplier Diversity or Diversity Spend
    • WBE (Woman-Owned Business Enterprise)
    • MBE (Minority Business Enterprise)
    • DBE (Disadvantaged Business Enterprise)
  • Payroll Services
  • Restricted & Residential Positions

How to find out if my client has Small Business or Supplier Diversity goals

  • Do you have any active projects or upcoming RFPs that require you to achieve Small Business or Diversity Spend?
  • If so, what certifications are required of your Small Business, MWBE, or DBE partners?
  • Does your organization have any initiatives or supplier diversity golas focused on increasing your spend with small or diverse owned companies?

Current JPI Certifications

  • Federal SBA Certification |EDWOSB
  • Commonwealth of PA | MBE & SDB
  • Pennsylvania Department of Transportation | DBE & PA UCP
  • Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council | MBE
  • New York Empire State Development | MBE
  • New YorkCity Department of Small Business | MBE
  • The Port Authority of NY & NJ | MWBE
  • Colorado Department of Transportation | DBE
  • City of Chicago | DBE
  • Washington State Office of Minority & Women’s Business Enterprises | DBE

Certified
Minority owned Business

MBE
Advocate of the Year

Diverse
Supplier of the Year

certified
Women Owned & Small Business

Meet the Aerotek Support Team

Mahesha Darji
Manager of Channel Operations

Reach out to Mahesha with any questions regarding any active customers or contractors we have working with Aerotek. Mahesha is responsible for making sure we maintain a high level of customer service and open communication with Aerotek and our end customers. She will ensure a seamless onboarding process for contractors and clients.

 

Fun Facts:

  • Originally from Sri Lanka
  • Has a 2 year old boy
  • Enjoys hiking, playing tennis, and workout classes
  • Loves to travel


Contact:
mahesha@thejpigroup.com

480-236-6855

Abdur Karim
Director of Strategic Sales and Channel Partnerships

Reach out to Abdur with any questions about how JPI can add value to Aerotek. Abdur is fully dedicated to providing insight and advice to your Aerotek team. His 15+ years of experience with the AGS family will allow for a effortless conversation.

 

Fun Facts:

  • Started with TEKsystems/ Maxim Group in 2000
  • I have 2 boys, 15 years and 9 years old
  • Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan
  • Ran Track at Michigan State University (Go Green)


Contact:
abdur@thejpigroup.com

248-217-8667

Kaitlin Beaman
Director of Strategic Sales and Channel Partnerships

Reach out to Kaitlin with questions about how to discuss Supplier-Diversity or Small-Business programs with your clients and how JPI can partner with TEKsystems to gain access to business within those programs. She can also help to respond to RFPs that you or your clients are responding to that have Small-Business, Women-Owned, or Minority-Owned spend requirements. Kaitlin started with Populus Group in 2011 and has 5+ years of experience with the AGS family which will allow for a seamless conversation.

Fun Facts:

  • Born and raised in Seattle, WA
  • Studied abroad in Paris for 1 year during junior year of college
  • Started skiing at age 2 and raced for a local ski team in junior high and high school
  • Enjoys hiking, backpacking, camping, skiing/ski touring, and discovering new outdoor adventures


Contact:
kaitlin@thejpigroup.com
425-890-2781

Educational Center

What is Small Business Spend?

  • Private Companies, Public companies, Federal and State Agencies can all have goals to achieve spend with vendors that are classified as a Small Business. All Federal and State projects have some form of Small Business spend requirements with their projects. These accounts & Projects use staffing firms & other vendors providing labor to help them achieve this spend.  Labor is always a easier channel to achive spend goal because of the dollar value needed to hit RFP Goals.
  • The Main categories of Small Business Include:
    SBE (Small Business Enterprise) | EDWOSB (Economically Disadvantaged Women Owned Small Business) | WBE (Women Business Enterprise) | MBE (Minority Business Enterprise) | VOSB (Veteran owned Small Business)

Why Do some of your customers need to achieve this spend?

  • It’s important to understand that a significant percentage of new jobs in the United States are created by Small Businesses in the United States. “Small Businesses are the United States economic engine; they are the key to grow economic output, entrepreneurship and private sector employment growth” US Secretary of State. The US government uses this Small Business Spend to grow and stabilize our economy and employment.

What is Supplier Diversity Spend?

  • Supplier Diversityprogram is a proactive business program which encourages corporations to use minority-owned, women owned, veteran owned, LGBT-owned, service disabled veteran owned, historically underutilized business, and Small Business Administration (SBA)-defined small business concerns as suppliers. It is not directly correlated with supply chain diversification, although utilizing more vendors may enhance supply chain diversification. Supplier diversity programs recognize that sourcing products and services from previously under-used suppliers helps to sustain and progressively transform a company’s supply chain, thus quantitatively reflecting the demographics of the community in which it operates by recording transactions with diverse suppliers.
  • Diverse- and women-owned business enterprises are among the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. economy. Diverse-owned businesses generated over 1 Trillion in annual revenue in 2019 and employed nearly 6.3 million workers.
  • Ultimately Supplier Diversity programs help to, provides small & minority companies access that they normally don’t have due to size and resources and bandwidth. Mos small, women or minority owend firms need to partner with a large organization in order to ever grow or scale. The end goal is to have a positive impact on the community in some fashion.

Why do my customers have this Supplier Diversity goal or initiative?

Organizations have supplier Diversity programs for 3 main reasons:

  • Project Compliance – Ensure their company meets any mandated compliance in contracts where they are executing the work.
  • Corporate Social Responsibility – companies conduct their business in a way that is ethical. This means taking account of their social, economic and environmental impact and consideration of human rights. 
  • Competitive Edge – Companies that diversify their vendor community receive the benefits of revenue growth, innovative ideas, and cost savings.
  • Marketing & Branding – Candidates and vendors are looking to work with organzations that share values that will help to progress society.

Below are a few of the biggest Myths with supplier Diversity:

  • Supplier Diversity programs provide Tax Breaks for companies
  • Supplier Diversity Programs help with Affirmative Action
  • Supplier Diversity programs are expensive to maintain

Small Business & Supplier Diversity Terms to become Familiar with:

Diverse Business Categories:

  • ANC – Alaska Native Claims – Any Regional Corporation, Village Corporation, Urban Corporation or Group Corporation organized under the laws of the State of Alaska in accordance with the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended 43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq. 13 C.F.R. § 124.3
  • DOBE – A Disability-Owned Business Enterprise is a business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned, operated, controlled and managed by individual(s) with disabilities, as defined by the U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN).
  • HUBZONEHistorically Underutilized Business (HUBZone) The business must be in an area located within one or more qualified census tract, qualified non-metropolitan counties or lands within the external boundaries of an Indian reservation. Status as a qualified HUBZone small business concern is determined by the Small Business Administration (SBA) in accordance with 13 CFR part 126. If the SBA determines that a concern is a qualified HUBZone small business concern it will issue a certification to that effect and will add the business to the List of Qualified HUBZone Small Businesses on its Internet website.
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender Business Enterprise – An LGBT business must be at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned, operated, managed and controlled by an LGBT person or persons who are either U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents, exercise independence from any non-LGBT business enterprise, have its principal place of business (headquarters) in the United States and have been formed as a legal entity in the United States.
  • MBE – Minority Business Enterprise – A business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned and operated by an individual(s) who is a U.S. citizen and their ancestry is African American, Native American, Hispanic-American, Asian Pacific or they originate from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or Sri-Lanka.
  • SBE – Small Business Enterprise – the Small Business Act defines a small business as an entity that is organized for profit; has a place of business in the United States; operates primarily within the United States or makes a significant contribution to the U.S. economy through payment of taxes or use of American products, materials or labor; is independently owned and operated; and is not dominant in its field on a national basis. The business may be a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation or any other legal form. In determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary to reflect industry differences.

SBA Resources

  • SDB – Small Disadvantaged Business – SDBs are at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more individuals who are both socially and economically disadvantaged. This can include a publicly-owned business that has at least 51% of its stock unconditionally owned by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individual and whose management and daily business is controlled by one or more such individuals.
  • SDVOB – Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business This is a business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more service-disabled veterans or, in the case of any publicly-owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more service-disabled veterans or, in the case of a veteran with a permanent and severe disability, the spouse or permanent caregiver of such veteran. “Service-disabled veteran” means a veteran, as defined in 38 U.S.C. 101(2), with a disability that is service-connected as defined in 38 U.S.C. 101(16).
  • SDVOSB – Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business This is a small business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more service-disabled veterans or, in the case of any publicly-owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more service-disabled veterans or, in the case of a veteran with a permanent and severe disability, the spouse or permanent caregiver of such veteran. “Service-disabled veteran” means a veteran, as defined in 38 U.S.C. 101(2), with a disability that is service-connected as defined in 38 U.S.C. 101(16)
  • VOB – Any business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more veterans (as defined at 38 U.S.C. 101(2)) or, in the case of any publicly-owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more veterans; and the management and daily operations of which are controlled by one or more veterans.
  • VOSBVeteran-Owned Small Business This is a small business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more veterans (as defined at 38 U.S.C. 101(2)) or, in the case of any publicly-owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more veterans; and the management and daily operations of which are controlled by one or more veterans.
  • WBE – Woman Business Enterprise A business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more women, or, the case of any publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more women; and whose management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. UTC prefers that such businesses be certified by a third-party such as the Women Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) or certifying government agency. In doing business with UTC, this certification must be active and maintained accordingly.
  • WOSB – Woman-Owned Small Business A small business that is at least fifty-one percent (51%) owned by one or more women, or, the case of any publicly owned business, at least 51% of the stock of which is owned by one or more women; and whose management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women.
  • 8(A) Program – An SBA (Small Business Administration) business development program created to help small disadvantaged businesses compete in the American economy and access the federal procurement market.
  • GSAGeneral Services Administration – The GSA is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. The GSA supplies products and communications for U.S. government offices, provides transportation and office space to federal employees, and develops government-wide cost-minimizing policies, as well as other management tasks.

GSA Resources

  • GSA SchedulesThe GSA Schedules program is the premier acquisition vehicle in government, with approximately $50 billion a year in spending or 10 percent (10%) of overall federal procurement spending. Eighty percent (80%) of GSA Multiple Award Schedule (MAS) contractors are small businesses who represent 36 percent (36%) of sales.

GSA Schedules

  • Mentor – Protégé | Mentor – Mentee Relationship  The U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Mentor-Protege Program enhances the capability of 8(a) participants to compete more successfully for federal government contracts. The program encourages private-sector relationships and expands SBA’s efforts to identify and respond to the developmental needs of 8(a) clients. Private Sector companies can also partner with Small Vendors to provide the resources, bandwidth they need to help their organization scale.
  • Supplier DiversityA business program that encourages the use of small and diverse businesses as suppliers. This may include entities as defined by the Small Business Association and beyond. Private sector companies are not mandated to hit any specific Goal unless they are regulated by the government.

Who is Responsible for Certifying small/Diverse organizations

    • NMSDC – National Supplier Development Council – The NMSDC seeks to provide a linkage between corporate America and minority-owned businesses. Its regional councils certify and match minority-owned businesses (Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American, etc.) with NMSDC member corporations, which want to purchase goods and services.
    • SBA – Small Business Administration – Small Business Administration The SBA was established in 1953 to provide financial, technical and management assistance to help Americans start, run and grow their businesses. It also plays a major role in the government’s disaster relief efforts by making low-interest recovery loans to both homeowners and businesses.
    • WBENCWomen’s Business Enterprise National Council WBENC is the nation’s leading advocate of women-owned businesses as suppliers to America’s corporations. It also is the largest third-party certifier of businesses owned and operated by women in the United States. WBENC works to foster diversity in the world of commerce with programs and policies designed to expand opportunities and eliminate barriers in the marketplace for women business owners. WBENC works with representatives of corporations to encourage the utilization and expansion of supplier/vendor diversity programs.

Interested In Learning More Or Getting Started?